Some Harkey Family History (with notes on Rambo, Bankston, Slayden & Pugh) / A Royal Line in Wales / Harkey Tombstones in Liberty Cemetery at Caruth, Dunklin Co., MO

Revised Sep. 5, 2016

Mary Ann Cordelia (“Mollie”) Harkey, daughter of Newton O. Harkey and wife Amanda M. Kimbrow, married 8 Sep 1887 at Kennett, MO, Alvis Cowan Bailey, son of Meshach and Lucinda Bailey.  Mollie and Alvis were the parents of my paternal grandmother Jewel Winifred (Bailey) Chipman.

Mollie’s grandparents Daniel David Harkey and Mary Ann Bankston were married 17 Dec 1822 in Wilkes Co., GA.  Mary Ann (Bankston) Harkey was the daughter of Hiram and Susannah (Slayden) Bankston.  

Daniel David and Mary Ann (Bankston) Harkey left Wilkes Co., GA for Pike Co., GA, where Daniel David Harkey is recorded on Tax Lists for 1834, 1835, 1838, and 1848.  By 1850 the family is found in Pontotoc Co., MS, and then moved on to Dunklin Co., MO “in 1853 and located on Grand Prairie, where they resided until their death.  They were both charter members of the old Harkey’s chapel class of the M.E.C.S., helped to build the first house by that name, and were always among the church’s most consistent and powerful workers.” [Smyth-Davis, Mary F.  (1896).  History of Dunklin County, Mo., 1845–1895.  St. Louis: Nixon-Jones Printing Co.]

Susannah was the daughter of Arthur Slayden, who came to GA from VA.  An incredible amount of research into the Slayden family is to be found in:

Slaton, Arthur J.  (1974).  The Slaton Family Ab Antiquitas With Brief Notes On Some Allied Families Second edition with revisions and additions – 1974.  Whittier, CA:  The Author.

Since that volume research has continued, and the following item is from a family bible (click on images to enlarge them).  However, the last child, Samuel Slayden, is shown as born on 9 Apr 1788. Rosamond (Pugh) Slayden’s birth date is 17 Mar 1738, making her 50 years old at Samuel’s birth. While biologically possible, it’s quite unusual. 

There is, in connection with Lewis Pugh, grandfather of Rosamond (Pugh) Slayden, a strange story regarding an inheritance in  Wales.  On 1 Sep 1740 in Richmond Co., VA, Ann Pugh, widow of Lewis Pugh, made a sworn deposition in which she stated that about 1704 she married Lewis Pugh and had by him 7 children: John, David, Elizabeth, Henry, Willoughby, Ann, and Lewis.  About 1731 Lewis Pugh learned from his brother-in-law Benjamin Jones of North Wales and Elizabeth his wife, the sister of Lewis Pugh, that an estate in South Wales had descended to Lewis Pugh from his father David Pugh.  In Apr 1731 Lewis Pugh and his son John Pugh sailed out of the Rappahannock River in VA on board the Captain Loxam bound for Liverpoole.  Ann Pugh was advised that Lewis Pugh died in South Wales and she and five of her children empowered her son David Pugh to collect what was due them from Lewis Pugh’s estate.  She could give no further information.  NB: David Pugh never returned to VA.  The surname “Pugh” is derived from “ap Hugh,” which makes sense to me.

The best study of the Pugh family, which indicates extensive ancestry in Wales, is:

ProGenealogists Official Ancestry.com research firm.  (2012).  Pugh Family Lineage Book One Research Reports For Dr. V. Watson  Pugh Preface By Paul C. Reed FASG.

Available to download at:

http://lewispugh.weebly.com/pugh-family-research-book-i.html

On p. 24 there is a lengthy pedigree from Sitriuc (Sygtrygg “Silkenbeard”), King of Dublin, d. 1042, who m. Slani, daughter of Brian Boru, High King of Ireland, to Lewis Pugh.  The 5th generation states that Cadwaladr ap Gruffudd, Prince of North Wales, m. Adles, daughter of Richard de Clare, and were the parents of Richert (Richard) ap Cadwaladr.  The Richard de Clare here referenced was 3rd Lord of Clare, d. 1136, son of Gilbert fitz Richard de Clare and Adeliza de Claremont.  He m. Adeliz, daughter of Ranulf, 4th Earl of Chester.

Pryce, Huw, ed.; Insley, Charles, asst. ed.  (2005).  The Acts Of Welsh Rulers 1120–1283 Published on behalf of the History and Law Committee of the University of Wales Board of Celtic Studies.  Cardiff: University Of Wales Press.  (see pp. 329–331)

According to the above, there’s a problem with Cadwaladr’s marriage: Richard de Clare’s daughter Alice is said to have entered a convent upon the death in 1141 of her first husband, Aubrey de Vere II.  The editors propose an alternate solution: Cadwaladr’s wife was actually Adeliza of Chester, Richard de Clare’s widow.  In support of this they cite Welsh genealogical collections which name Cadwaladr’s wife as “Adles daughter of the earl of Chester,” who was the mother of 4 of his sons, including Rhicert (“Richard”—evidently the Viceroy of Dinllaen in Llyn, North Wales’ main port to Ireland), and Randlff (Ranulph).  This would place her as the daughter of Ranulph le Meschin, 4th Earl of Chester by Lucy, who, according to Keats-Rohan, was the daughter of Turold, sheriff of Lincoln by a daughter of William Malet.  Others are not quite so certain (see CP VII Appendix J).  Why does Lucy put me in mind of Oak Island?

The Complete Peerage, Vol. III, p. 243 calls her “Adeliz, sister of Ranulph ‘des Gernons,’ Earl of Chester,” and notes she “was rescued from the Welsh by Miles of Gloucester.”

Ancestral Roots Eighth Edition, Line 132D claims Adeliz’s second husband was Robert de Condet, d. 1141, son of Osbert de Condet, but neither The Complete Peerage nor J.R. Planche (1870) mention such a marriage.  Certainly marriage to a Welsh prince would be of considerably more prestige, and given the evidence above, I think Cadwaladr’s marriage to the widow of Richard de Clare is adequately supported, but more evidence is welcome.

Thus it appears that Lewis Pugh’s ancestry follows the family of the earls of Chester rather than the lords of Clare, and that is a more tortuous path.  Adeliz’s father Ranulph le Meschin, the 4th earl, was the son of Ranulph, Vicomte de Bayeaux by Margaret, sister of Hugh d’Avranches, the 2nd earl.  Richard, the 3rd earl, had drowned in the White Ship disaster which took the life of William, son of King Henry I of England.  David C. Douglas, the biographer of William the Conqueror, says Hugh’s mother Emma wasn’t the daughter of William the Conqueror’s mother Herleve, and therefore Hugh wasn’t William’s nephew.  So we are left with the conclusion that the meteoric rise of Hugh the 2nd earl was due to his support of William the Conqueror’s English venture and not any known family relationship.

Nonetheless, Lewis Pugh’s ancestry is interesting for its connection to royal figures in Wales and Ireland.  A fascinating account of Gruffudd ap Cynan, King of Gwynedd (d. 1137), father of Cadwaladr, is found in:

Jones M.A., Arthur.  (1910).  The History Of Gruffydd ap Cynan The Welsh Text With Translation, Introduction, And Notes.  Manchester: The University Of Manchester Press.  (Free download from Internet Archive.)

The Bankstons were originally Swedish settlers along the Delaware River in PA, and descend from the famous Swedish pioneer Peter Gunnarson Rambo (ca. 1612–1698) through his daughter Gertrude who married Andrew Bankson (Anders Bengtsson).  

Soderlund, Jean R.  (2015).  Lenape Country Delaware Valley Society Before William Penn.  Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Soderlund’s study of the early Delaware Valley contains many references to the Rambo and Bengtsson families, with a backdrop of Lenape (Delaware Native American tribe) relations with waves of Swedish, Dutch, and English settlers.

For Rambo genealogy, see:

Rambo, Beverly Nelson; Beatty, Ronald S.  (2007).  The Rambo Family Tree 2ND Edition. July 2007 Descendants Of Peter Gunnarson Rambo Third Volume: Descendants Of His Daughter, Gertrude Rambo Bankson.  Bloomington, IN: AuthorHouse.

A thorough study of the Bankston family is:

Haigler, Anne Martin.  (1998).  Bankston Cousins 1656–1996.  Florissant, MO: Hardbound, Inc.

Mary Ann (Bankston) Harkey’s 2nd great-grandmother Rebecca (Hendricks) Bankson was a descendant of PA pioneer Albertus Hendrickson who was of Dutch ancestry.

The principle treatise on the Hendricks family is:

Davenport, John Scott.  (1993).  The Frontier Hendricks Being A Quest to Identify and Define The Descendants of Albertus Hendrickson, Carpenter, A Dutch Emigrant To America Before 1670, Who Died in Chester County, Province of Pennsylvania, in 1716 Volume I, 1991–1993 Working Papers (Reports 1–12).  La Plata, MD:  The Frontier Hendricks Association.

[The Rambo Apple, introduced into the Colony of New Sweden (PA) by Peter Gunnarson Rambo and his family.]

Daniel and Mary left GA and settled in Pontotoc Co., MS, where they’re found in the 1850 Pontotoc Federal census on pp. 92B & 93.   Daniel D. Harkey, son of Daniel and Mary Ann, m. Nancy L. Hamlin on 25 Sep 1851 in Pontotoc Co.  The family moved on to Dunklin Co., MO.  Several of their sons became prominent in local affairs.

CENSUS YR: 1850
STATE: MS
COUNTY: PONTOTOC
REEL NO: M432-360 PAGE NO: 93 HOUSEHOLD: 535
REFERENCE: 23RD DAY OF SEPTEMBER 1850, ANDREW J. CLARK ASS’T MARSHAL
________________________________________________

HARKEY DANIEL 53 M FARMER 1,880 NC
HARKEY MA 48 F GA (1)
HARKEY DANIEL 9 M FARMER GA (2)
HARKEY HIRAM 15 M GA
HARKEY WELLBORNE 13 M GA
HARKEY NEWTON 12 M GA (3)
HARKEY NEWSOM 12 M GA (3)
HARKEY FRANCIS 8 M GA
HARKEY JASPER 7 M GA

(1) Mary Ann (Bankston) Harkey

(2) Daniel Harkey married in Pontotoc Co. in 1851, so he wasn’t 9 in 1850. This is probably an error in the transcription, and he was actually 19.

(3) Twins

(Detail of 1850 Pontotoc Co., MS Federal Census.)

[Detail from the 1860 Dunklin Co., MO Federal Census showing Mary Ann (Bankston) Harkey next door to her son Samuel Jones Harkey, a Methodist minister.  Also in his household is a school teacher.  Click on image to enlarge it.]

Daniel and Mary had nine sons:  Samuel Jones Harkey, Methodist minister; William M. Harkey, state legislator; Daniel D. Harkey; Hiram W. Harkey; Wilburn David Harkey (buried at Cude Cemetary, Senath, MO); Newsom A. Harkey; Newton O. Harkey (twin of Newsom A. Harkey); Francis M. “Nugg” Harkey, judge; and Jasper H. “Jap” Harkey (buried at Cude Cemetary, Senath, MO).  Wilburn David Harkey and Jasper H. Harkey were active Masons.

I shot this series of tombstone photos about 1990 at Liberty Cemetary near Caruth in Dunklin Co., MO.  The tombstones are in deplorable condition.  Those of Daniel David Harkey, Newton O. Harkey, and Amanda M. (Kimbrow) Harkey are cracked.  I was able to locate both pieces of Newton and Amanda’s tombstones, and put them back together to take photos.  Often tombstones that are difficult to photograph can be read in person.

(Click on images to enlarge them.)

(Daniel David Harkey, b. Mar. 25, 1797 in NC, d. Jun. 25, 1858 in Dunklin Co., MO.)

[Mary A. (Bankston) Harkey, wife of Daniel David Harkey, b. Sep. 25, 1801 in Wilkes Co., GA, d. Mar. 7, 1879 in Dunklin Co., MO.  This grave is unusual because there’s a footstone reading “Mary A.” (see below).]

[Newton O. Harkey, son of Daniel David and Mary A. (Bankston) Harkey, b. Nov. 22, 1838 in Pike Co., GA, d. Feb. 2, 1880 of malaria in Dunklin Co.]

[Amanda M. (Kimbrow) Harkey, wife of Newton O. Harkey, b. Dec. 26, 1843 in MO, d. Sep. 7, 1901 in Dunklin Co.  Amanda was the daughter of William and Annie Bradford (Branch) Kimbrow.  William Kimbrow was an early Dunklin Co. sheriff.]

[Hiram W. Harkey, son of Daniel David and Mary A. (Bankston) Harkey, b. 1835, d. Nov. 8, 1856.  Although the year of birth is plainly visible, the month and day of birth weren’t legible.]

DIRECTIONS TO LIBERTY CEMETERY NEAR CARUTH, MO:

From Kennett (county seat of Dunklin Co., MO), take HWY 412 S to HWY Y, at County Rd 549C turn right.  Cemetery can be seen from HWY Y before the turn off.  I don’t know if the tombstones I photographed remain in situ in recognizable condition.

~ by Jeffrey Thomas Chipman on July 15, 2016.