Family Of Hillary Lillian Vaughan and Jesse Otto (Jeffery) Scarff (maternal grandparents) / with Notices of Wilcox & McMillen / my Chipman family (a ghostly emulsion)

•August 19, 2017 • Comments Off on Family Of Hillary Lillian Vaughan and Jesse Otto (Jeffery) Scarff (maternal grandparents) / with Notices of Wilcox & McMillen / my Chipman family (a ghostly emulsion)

Revised Sep 3, 2017

I penned a genealogical book entitled Some Chipman Families Of The Southern States, the last edition of which appeared in March 1993. Occasionally a copy of an earlier edition comes up for sale on Amazon.com.  I lost my copy of the first edition, so I bought one.  It had been given a library binding by the library and then replaced with a later edition. The book covered many families who intermarried with the Chipmans.  One of them was the Vaughan family of my maternal grandmother Hillary, who was little more than 15 years old when she married Jesse Otto Jeffery Scarff.

The Vaughans were early Missouri settlers, who came to the section from Kentucky. My second great-grandfather Wilson Milton Vaughan (1850–1950), a Miller County character, missed being 100 years old by less than two months.  His son, my great-grandfather Eric Lyman Vaughan, moved to Wapello County, IA, where he died at the age of 30.

This clipping from The Autogram of Miller County for December 5, 1940 commemorates Wilson Milton Vaughan’s 90th birthday:

(Miller County History, 17 Jun 1983.)

Our first proven Vaughan ancestor is Joshua Vaughan (father of Wilson Milton Vaughan), who married Elizabeth (Betsey) Birdsong:

Although Birdsong is a Native American name, these Birdsongs weren’t Native American. They first appeared in York County, VA in the early 18th century, and were later prominent in Sussex County.  Birdsong is thought to be a corruption of a name possibly Scandinavian in origin, like “Bartsong” or another phonetic variant.

Because the Vaughans were numerous, with many bearing the same given names, I cannot with certainty identify a place of origin beyond KY. There is one Vaughan family centered in Bedford County, VA in the late 18th century who appear closely related, and members of it probably migrated to Monroe and Barren Cos., KY.  What is certain is that the Vaughans of Cooper Co., MO were from Barren and Monroe Cos., KY.

But who was Joshua Vaughan?  He was born in 1805 in VA, exact place unknown.

According to Jefferson Davis Vaughan, a son of Joshua Vaughan by Joshua’s second wife Susan Wyrick, Joshua wasn’t a “Vaughan” at all—his birth surname was actually “Wilson,” and he had been adopted by a Vaughan.

I have a problem with that story.  The first formal adoption law in the United States was enacted in MA in 1851.  In the South, orphans were bound out by the county courts to serve as apprentices, to a relative, or someone unrelated.  But could Joshua “Wilson” have been informally adopted by a Vaughan family—who may have been related to his birth family—and he simply took the name of “Vaughan?”  Of course, and that’s the difficulty with family tales like this: there’s no independent evidence for or against this version of Joshua’s origins.  But the legal machinery in existence at the time Joshua would have been “orphaned” doesn’t support Jefferson Davis Vaughan’s account.

Joshua is also alleged to be the son of Benjamin and Susanna (Burnett) Vaughan, but for chronological reasons, that’s unlikely.  Benjamin Vaughan is presumed to be the son of William Vaughan Sr. of Monroe Co., KY.  My theory is that Benjamin Vaughan was Joshua Vaughan’s uncle, and that Joshua was actually the son of William Vaughan Jr., whose wife is unknown.  William Vaughan Jr. didn’t make the trek to MO and may have died in KY.  Joshua did name his first son William.  But nearly all of the early records in Monroe Co., KY, except for the tax records, are lost.  It’s one of the most total courthouse disasters I’ve seen.

This pedigree, however, begins with the Scott family.  Thomas Scott Jr., son of Thomas Scott and Sarah Mahurin [see marriage bond in “Branching Of The Yoke (Crossing Howland” column)] was an interesting figure. (See  “THOMAS SCOTT JR., FREEMASONRY, AND MILLER CO., MO POLITICS” column.]

Thomas Scott Jr. moved to CA, but his wife America Stillwell remained in Miller County, supporting the opinion that their marriage was unhappy. America was probably a descendant of the Stillwell family of Dubois County, Indiana, and the daughter of Richard Stilwell.  It’s a common problem with pioneer families searching for the Promised Land: families split up, and often the place they came to was no better or even worse than the place they’d left. In due course Thomas Scott Jr. returned to Miller County, but never again lived with America.

The page in Some Chipman Families Of The Southern States regarding the Scott family used an unorthodox system of notation, so I’ll just give the highlights.  The principle treatise on this Scott family is:

Scott, E. Harrison.  (1951).  Arthur Martin Scott 1777-1858 His Ancestors and His Descendants. Dayton:  The Otterbein Press.

Arthur Scott, son of Arthur and Agness Scott, was born ca. 1736/7, probably in Chester Co., PA. He married on 25 Apr 1765, Jean Ross.  After a brief sojourn in Washington Co., PA, Arthur Scott moved to Shelby Co., KY, where on 29 Sep 1805 his son Thomas Scott wed Sarah Mahurin, daughter of Samuel Mahurin, a descendant of Hugh Mahurin of Taunton, MA.  For about 4 years Arthur Scott lived on Brashears Creek, and then purchased land on Little Beech Creek.  He was a Constable in Shelby Co. Arthur Scott died ca. 1824/5 and was probably buried on his farm.

Arthur Scott sold his son Thomas Scott a tract of 159 1/2 acres on Beech Creek for the token amount of $1.00.  In 1821 Thomas Scott sold the land and moved to Dubois Co., Indiana.  The couple moved on to Miller Co., MO, and were living as late as 29 Jan 1858, when they sold 160 acres of land to Lev W. Albertson.

Thomas Scott Jr., the subject of the above short biography, was born 8 Dec 1816 in Shelby Co., KY, and died 30 Aug 1887 in Miller Co., MO, after having returned from CA due to an apparent failure in operating a mine.  He was an active Mason.  His wife, America (Stillwell) Scott, died 13 Nov 1897. Thomas and Sarah (Mahurin) Scott, and Thomas Scott Jr. and wife America are buried at Scott Cemetary, Tuscumbia, MO.

Thomas Scott Jr. recorded the births of his children in the family bible, and daughter Rachel Jane Scott, first wife of the above mentioned Wilson Milton Vaughan, was born on Sunday, 17 Apr 1859 in Miller Co.  On 11 Mar 1875 she married Wilson, and their 6th child was my great-grandfather, Eric Lyman Vaughan 29 Sep 1885–19 May 1916.

(This faded photo is the only one I have of Eric Lyman Vaughan as an adult, but by cropping it I managed to give a fair rendering of his face.)

(This record, from the 1915 Iowa state census, is useful because Eric Lyman Vaughan’s first child was born in 1911, after the 1910 Federal Census, and Eric died in 1916, before the 1920 Federal Census.  The availability of state censuses varies; check with your state archives.)

(The elegant Nora Ann McMillen.  Those Southern flowers, once so beautiful, the sickly sweet smell of decay.)

[A drab Nora Ann (McMillen) Vaughan Messer (Left) holding her granddaughter Valerie, ca. 1930.  Other woman and baby unknown.]

[Tombstone of Eric Lyman Vaughan and Nora Ann (McMillen) (Vaughan) Messer, Brooks Cemetary near Ottumwa, Wapello Co., IA.]

(Marriage record of Thomas Calvin McMillen and Nancy Theodocia Wilcox, Miller Co., MO, 9 Oct 1887.  Miller Co., MO Marriage Book C, p. 361.  Nancy’s middle initial is incorrectly shown as “J.”  The marriage took place at the home of her mother, Manerva Wilcox.  Click on image to enlarge it.)

[Tombstone of Nancy Theodocia Wilcox (13 Jul 1861–18 Apr 1910; tombstone gives birth year as 1862), whose blue blood and lack of judgement brought distinction and ruin to my mother’s family; buried with her second husband Thomas Calvin McMillen (25 Dec 1864–3 Feb 1935) at Brooks Cemetary, Wapello Co., IA.  Two of their children are buried with them.  It’s doubtful Nancy ever learned of the fate of her first husband, James T. Burris, who deserted her for Miller Co. trollop Charlotte Colvin and disappeared into the Indian Territory.  Nancy divorced Burris “in abstentia.”]

[Here’s an obscure item:  the obituary for Thomas Calvin McMillen in the Ottumwa Courier, Tuesday, 5 Feb 1935, p. 13.  The author of this notice had few words for the departed.  McMillen actually died in Henry Co., IA, but was shipped to Ottumwa in Wapello Co. to be buried in Brooks Cemetary beside his wife, Nancy Theodocia (Wilcox) McMillen.]

Eric Lyman Vaughan married Nora Ann McMillen, daughter of Thomas Calvin and Nancy Theodocia (Wilcox) McMillen.  They had 3 children:  Virgil Zennia Vaughan, Hillary Lillian Vaughan, and Harold Milton Vaughan.  Nora Ann (McMillen) Vaughan remarried to Sheridan Messer and had four children:  Milo Messer; Dwight Messer; Rebekah Louise Messer (m. Warren Stiefel); and Joseph Thomas Messer.

(Virgil Zennia Vaughan and Hillary Lillian Vaughan, ca. 1914.)

(Marriage record for Virgil Zennia Vaughan, Hillary Lillian Vaughan’s older brother.  He was married by the same Baptist minister.)

(Most photos don’t affect me, but in these three children:  Harold Milton Vaughan; Hillary Lillian Vaughan; and Virgil Zennia Vaughan, I see no happiness, although many people, including children, had stiff expressions when photographed.  Ottumwa, IA, ca. 1918.)

(Hillary Lillian Vaughan, ca. 1926.  Two years later she was a wife and the next year a mother.)

Hillary Lillian Vaughan 20 May 1913–4 Feb 1989 married on 3 Oct 1928 in Henry Co., IA Jesse Otto Jeffery Scarff.  Because Hillary was 15, her mother Nora Ann (McMillen) (Vaughan) Messer gave consent to the marriage.  The couple had 10 children, of whom 9 reached adulthood. 

Below: Iowa State Board Of Health marriage record.  Lines 1 and 2 read: “By whom affidavit, if any, is made Mrs. Nora Messer/By whom consent to marriage is given Mother of Bride only living parent.”  My grandfather gave his aunt Emma Jane Huffman and John H. Scarff as his parents because he had been legally adopted, much to the dismay of his actual father, Earnest Ervin Jeffery.  When Effie died, Earnie couldn’t work and take care of a young child, so Jesse was placed with the childless Emma.  I think Emma spoiled him.

Above: One Sunday after church, ca. 1941, Mt. Pleasant, IA.  If you see 6 children in this photo, you’re wrong.  Standing next to my grandfather Jesse is my grandmother Hillary.  The children in descending order of height are Valerie, (Jesse) Leroy, John, Noma, and Mary.  Given Hillary’s age, what sort of courtship could she and Jesse have had?  Hillary had just turned 15 on 20 May 1928.  Less than 5 months later she was married.  The marriage record lists both as residents of Rome.  It’s obvious this was a shotgun marriage, but what arrangement existed between Jesse and Hillary’s mother Nora has passed away with them.  Jesse had an “Old Testament Patriarch” mentality, a narrative that subordinates women and children.  Situations like this scandalized reformers who pressed for 16 as the minimum age to marry with parental consent.

(Abandoned building, Rome, Henry Co., IA.  In 1930 Rome had 144 residents.)

[State of Wyoming Death Certificate of Hillary Lillian (Vaughan) Scarff.  Click on image to enlarge.]

[Jesse Otto (Jeffery) Scarff, ca. 1909.  Children put on their “Sunday Go To Church” clothes for portraits.  In ordinary attire, they looked pretty grubby.  It was the era in which children amused themselves by catching frogs and turtles, digging holes, and splashing in creeks.  It’s called the Outdoors.]

(Another useful State census: detail from the 1925 Henry Co., IA Tippecanoe Township schedule.  In this instance, the names of the individual’s parents are given, very helpful in merged households.  Jesse Scarff’s parents are
Ernest I. Jeffrey and Effie V. Huffman.  Click on image to enlarge.)

[State of Wyoming Death Certificate for Jesse Otto (Jeffery) Scarff.  His father’s name was Earnest Ervin Jeffery, not Ernst Jeffery Scarff.  Click on image to enlarge.]

(My grandfather’s obituary from the “Mt. Pleasant News” of 13 Mar 1990.  “I.A.A.P.” is the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant.  Trenton is actually in Henry Co., IA.  Jeffery D. Scarff was adopted; I know nothing of his birth family.  My parents were living in Springfield, MO when Jesse died.  My mother was a member of Rachel Donelson Chapter DAR.  At the time I was working for AT&T in Oakbrook Terrace, IL.)

CHILDREN

1. Valerie Berniece Scarff born 28 Sep 1929; married 20 Jun 1948 Ralph Vernon Chipman, died 18 Sep 2016

(“The Mt. Pleasant News” for Thursday, 17 Jun 1948.)

 (“The Mt. Pleasant News” for Monday, 21 Jun 1948.)

Children:

a.  Jeffrey Thomas Chipman born 25 July 1951

(“The News, Mt. Pleasant, Ia.,” for Thursday, 26 Jul 1951, p. 3.)

b.  Diane Gay Chipman born 29 Sep 1952; married Glen Christopher Joyce (two children: dau. Cameron Brooke Joyce, m. Kevin Joseph Gibson, one dau. Wren Emeline Gibson b. 4 Oct 2017; son Marc Christopher Joyce)

(“The Mount Pleasant News” of Iowa for Tuesday, 30 Sep 1952, p. 6.)

(The somnolent Wren Emeline Gibson.)

(Ralph Vernon Chipman and his grandson Marc Christopher Joyce.  In the background a cat is snoozing on the turntable.)

c.  Debora Ann Chipman born 8 Oct 1953; married Arthur David Allred (two children: dau. Nora Elizabeth Allred m. Danny Wilson, div., one dau. Sophie Jewel Wilson; son Wesley David Allred)

(“The Burlington Hawk Eye Gazette” for Friday, October 16, 1953, p. 6.)

(My grand-niece Sophie Jewel Wilson.)

d.  Mary Beth Chipman born 27 Jan 1958; married Randall Alan Roguski; div. (one child: dau. Olivia Ann Roguski aka “Olivia Zapo” of Laguna Beach, CA, m. Jordan Zapotechne)

(“The Burlington Hawk Eye Gazette” for Saturday, February 22, 1958, p. 6.)

(My niece Olivia Ann Roguski.  As “Olivia Zapo” she makes lifestyle videos for YouTube.)

[Photo made at wedding of my sister Mary Beth Chipman to Randall Alan Roguski.  Left to Right: Jeffrey Thomas Chipman (Me), Diane Gay (Chipman) Joyce, Valerie Berniece (Jeffery Scarff) Chipman, Randall Alan Roguski, Mary Beth Chipman, Ralph Vernon Chipman, Debora Ann (Chipman) Allred, Arthur David Allred.  Mary Beth, being a modern woman, did not take her husband’s name.  She and Randy divorced.]

2. Jesse LeRoy Scarff born 27 Jan 1933; married Leona Witrofsky; div.

(“The News, Mt. Pleasant, Ia.”, for Monday, 19 Nov 1951.  At less than 5 months of age, I was a bon vivant.  I hope LeRoy got stuffed.)

Children:

a.  James Dean Scarff

b.  Lorna Scarff

c.  Christopher Scarff

3.  John Eric Scarff born 28 Jan 1936; married Marilyn Kay DalAve

Children:

a.  Susan R. Scarff born 28 Aug 1962

b.  Christopher E. Scarff born 2 Dec 1964

c.  Ronald D. Scarff born 11 Oct 1969

4. Noma Louise Scarff born 9 Sep 1937; married (i) Tom Fisher adopted bro. of Franklin Louis Fisher, div. (ii) Edward Colewell Talbott born 16 Jun 1943

No children of either marriage

5. Mary Margaret Scarff born 7 Jul 1939; married George Presley Watson

Children:

a.  John Eric Watson

b.  Andrew Clark Watson

c.  Jessica Lynn Watson

6. Linda Kay Scarff born 7 Jan 1943; married Franklin Louis Fisher

Children:

a.  Frank William Fisher

b.  Christopher John Fisher born 18 Jan 1968, died 19 Apr 2006

c.  Rebekah Lynn Fisher

d.  Jonathan Conrad Fisher

7. Diane Lu Scarff born 26 Aug 1944; married (i) Emmett Ridinger (ii) Jack Peters

Children by (i):

a.  Michael Ridinger

No children by (ii)

b.  a daughter adopted by Judith Ellen (Scarff) Septer *

8. Judith Ellen Scarff born 19 Oct 1946; married 24 Jul 1966 Ronald Eugene Septer, died 27 Aug 2014 at Mt. Pleasant, IA

Children:

a.  Cynthia Lynn Septer born 12 Jun 1968

b.  Kayleigh Septer (Kayleigh Septer earned a Master’s Degree in Library and Information Science from San Jose State University and is Treasurer of James Harlan Chapter DAR.)

c.  David Eugene Septer born 1 Jun 1972

d.  an adopted daughter *

9. Michael Gene Scarff born 20 Jan 1949; married Barbara Esther Johnson

No children

10. Cynthia Lynn Scarff born 21 Apr 1957, died 22 Apr 1957; buried Forest Home Cemetery, Mt. Pleasant, IA

[* I  am withholding the name and birth date of this individual.  The source of this information was Valerie Berniece (Jeffery Scarff) Chipman.  This individual shares her mother’s pedigree, as will her descendants.  This is a mtDNA (female descent) line, so it’s unnecessary to perform a paternity test.  mtDNA is passed from the mother to her children, whether male or female; however, if her child is male, he can’t pass mtDNA to his children.  Therefore, mtDNA will pass from mother to daughter as long as the chain of women is unbroken by males in the direct line of descent.]

This is a complete list of the children and grandchildren of Jesse Otto Jeffery Scarff and his wife Hillary Lillian Vaughan.  And that brings us full circle.

Some Harkey Family History (with notes on Rambo, Bankston, Slayden & Pugh) / A Royal Line in Wales / Harkey Tombstones in Liberty Cemetery at Caruth, Dunklin Co., MO

•August 15, 2017 • Comments Off on Some Harkey Family History (with notes on Rambo, Bankston, Slayden & Pugh) / A Royal Line in Wales / Harkey Tombstones in Liberty Cemetery at Caruth, Dunklin Co., MO

Revised Sep. 5, 2016

Mary Ann Cordelia (“Mollie”) Harkey, daughter of Newton O. Harkey and wife Amanda M. Kimbrow, married 8 Sep 1887 at Kennett, MO, Alvis Cowan Bailey, son of Meshach and Lucinda Bailey.  Mollie and Alvis were the parents of my paternal grandmother Jewel Winifred (Bailey) Chipman.

Mollie’s grandparents Daniel David Harkey and Mary Ann Bankston were married 17 Dec 1822 in Wilkes Co., GA.  Mary Ann (Bankston) Harkey was the daughter of Hiram and Susannah (Slayden) Bankston.  

Daniel David and Mary Ann (Bankston) Harkey left Wilkes Co., GA for Pike Co., GA, where Daniel David Harkey is recorded on Tax Lists for 1834, 1835, 1838, and 1848.  By 1850 the family is found in Pontotoc Co., MS, and then moved on to Dunklin Co., MO “in 1853 and located on Grand Prairie, where they resided until their death.  They were both charter members of the old Harkey’s chapel class of the M.E.C.S., helped to build the first house by that name, and were always among the church’s most consistent and powerful workers.” [Smyth-Davis, Mary F.  (1896).  History of Dunklin County, Mo., 1845–1895.  St. Louis: Nixon-Jones Printing Co.]

Susannah was the daughter of Arthur Slayden, who came to GA from VA.  An incredible amount of research into the Slayden family is to be found in:

Slaton, Arthur J.  (1974).  The Slaton Family Ab Antiquitas With Brief Notes On Some Allied Families Second edition with revisions and additions – 1974.  Whittier, CA:  The Author.

Since that volume research has continued, and the following item is from a family bible (click on images to enlarge them).  However, the last child, Samuel Slayden, is shown as born on 9 Apr 1788. Rosamond (Pugh) Slayden’s birth date is 17 Mar 1738, making her 50 years old at Samuel’s birth. While biologically possible, it’s quite unusual. 

There is, in connection with Lewis Pugh, grandfather of Rosamond (Pugh) Slayden, a strange story regarding an inheritance in  Wales.  On 1 Sep 1740 in Richmond Co., VA, Ann Pugh, widow of Lewis Pugh, made a sworn deposition in which she stated that about 1704 she married Lewis Pugh and had by him 7 children: John, David, Elizabeth, Henry, Willoughby, Ann, and Lewis.  About 1731 Lewis Pugh learned from his brother-in-law Benjamin Jones of North Wales and Elizabeth his wife, the sister of Lewis Pugh, that an estate in South Wales had descended to Lewis Pugh from his father David Pugh.  In Apr 1731 Lewis Pugh and his son John Pugh sailed out of the Rappahannock River in VA on board the Captain Loxam bound for Liverpoole.  Ann Pugh was advised that Lewis Pugh died in South Wales and she and five of her children empowered her son David Pugh to collect what was due them from Lewis Pugh’s estate.  She could give no further information.  NB: David Pugh never returned to VA.  The surname “Pugh” is derived from “ap Hugh,” which makes sense to me.

The best study of the Pugh family, which indicates extensive ancestry in Wales, is:

ProGenealogists Official Ancestry.com research firm.  (2012).  Pugh Family Lineage Book One Research Reports For Dr. V. Watson  Pugh Preface By Paul C. Reed FASG.

Available to download at:

http://lewispugh.weebly.com/pugh-family-research-book-i.html

On p. 24 there is a lengthy pedigree from Sitriuc (Sygtrygg “Silkenbeard”), King of Dublin, d. 1042, who m. Slani, daughter of Brian Boru, High King of Ireland, to Lewis Pugh.  The 5th generation states that Cadwaladr ap Gruffudd, Prince of North Wales, m. Adles, daughter of Richard de Clare, and were the parents of Richert (Richard) ap Cadwaladr.  The Richard de Clare here referenced was 3rd Lord of Clare, d. 1136, son of Gilbert fitz Richard de Clare and Adeliza de Claremont.  He m. Adeliz, daughter of Ranulf, 4th Earl of Chester.

Pryce, Huw, ed.; Insley, Charles, asst. ed.  (2005).  The Acts Of Welsh Rulers 1120–1283 Published on behalf of the History and Law Committee of the University of Wales Board of Celtic Studies.  Cardiff: University Of Wales Press.  (see pp. 329–331)

According to the above, there’s a problem with Cadwaladr’s marriage: Richard de Clare’s daughter Alice is said to have entered a convent upon the death in 1141 of her first husband, Aubrey de Vere II.  The editors propose an alternate solution: Cadwaladr’s wife was actually Adeliza of Chester, Richard de Clare’s widow.  In support of this they cite Welsh genealogical collections which name Cadwaladr’s wife as “Adles daughter of the earl of Chester,” who was the mother of 4 of his sons, including Rhicert (“Richard”—evidently the Viceroy of Dinllaen in Llyn, North Wales’ main port to Ireland), and Randlff (Ranulph).  This would place her as the daughter of Ranulph le Meschin, 4th Earl of Chester by Lucy, who, according to Keats-Rohan, was the daughter of Turold, sheriff of Lincoln by a daughter of William Malet.  Others are not quite so certain (see CP VII Appendix J).  Why does Lucy put me in mind of Oak Island?

The Complete Peerage, Vol. III, p. 243 calls her “Adeliz, sister of Ranulph ‘des Gernons,’ Earl of Chester,” and notes she “was rescued from the Welsh by Miles of Gloucester.”

Ancestral Roots Eighth Edition, Line 132D claims Adeliz’s second husband was Robert de Condet, d. 1141, son of Osbert de Condet, but neither The Complete Peerage nor J.R. Planche (1870) mention such a marriage.  Certainly marriage to a Welsh prince would be of considerably more prestige, and given the evidence above, I think Cadwaladr’s marriage to the widow of Richard de Clare is adequately supported, but more evidence is welcome.

Thus it appears that Lewis Pugh’s ancestry follows the family of the earls of Chester rather than the lords of Clare, and that is a more tortuous path.  Adeliz’s father Ranulph le Meschin, the 4th earl, was the son of Ranulph, Vicomte de Bayeaux by Margaret, sister of Hugh d’Avranches, the 2nd earl.  Richard, the 3rd earl, had drowned in the White Ship disaster which took the life of William, son of King Henry I of England.  David C. Douglas, the biographer of William the Conqueror, says Hugh’s mother Emma wasn’t the daughter of William the Conqueror’s mother Herleve, and therefore Hugh wasn’t William’s nephew.  So we are left with the conclusion that the meteoric rise of Hugh the 2nd earl was due to his support of William the Conqueror’s English venture and not any known family relationship.

Nonetheless, Lewis Pugh’s ancestry is interesting for its connection to royal figures in Wales and Ireland.  A fascinating account of Gruffudd ap Cynan, King of Gwynedd (d. 1137), father of Cadwaladr, is found in:

Jones M.A., Arthur.  (1910).  The History Of Gruffydd ap Cynan The Welsh Text With Translation, Introduction, And Notes.  Manchester: The University Of Manchester Press.  (Free download from Internet Archive.)

The Bankstons were originally Swedish settlers along the Delaware River in PA, and descend from the famous Swedish pioneer Peter Gunnarson Rambo (ca. 1612–1698) through his daughter Gertrude who married Andrew Bankson (Anders Bengtsson).  

Soderlund, Jean R.  (2015).  Lenape Country Delaware Valley Society Before William Penn.  Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Soderlund’s study of the early Delaware Valley contains many references to the Rambo and Bengtsson families, with a backdrop of Lenape (Delaware Native American tribe) relations with waves of Swedish, Dutch, and English settlers.

For Rambo genealogy, see:

Rambo, Beverly Nelson; Beatty, Ronald S.  (2007).  The Rambo Family Tree 2ND Edition. July 2007 Descendants Of Peter Gunnarson Rambo Third Volume: Descendants Of His Daughter, Gertrude Rambo Bankson.  Bloomington, IN: AuthorHouse.

A thorough study of the Bankston family is:

Haigler, Anne Martin.  (1998).  Bankston Cousins 1656–1996.  Florissant, MO: Hardbound, Inc.

Mary Ann (Bankston) Harkey’s 2nd great-grandmother Rebecca (Hendricks) Bankson was a descendant of PA pioneer Albertus Hendrickson who was of Dutch ancestry.

The principle treatise on the Hendricks family is:

Davenport, John Scott.  (1993).  The Frontier Hendricks Being A Quest to Identify and Define The Descendants of Albertus Hendrickson, Carpenter, A Dutch Emigrant To America Before 1670, Who Died in Chester County, Province of Pennsylvania, in 1716 Volume I, 1991–1993 Working Papers (Reports 1–12).  La Plata, MD:  The Frontier Hendricks Association.

[The Rambo Apple, introduced into the Colony of New Sweden (PA) by Peter Gunnarson Rambo and his family.]

Daniel and Mary left GA and settled in Pontotoc Co., MS, where they’re found in the 1850 Pontotoc Federal census on pp. 92B & 93.   Daniel D. Harkey, son of Daniel and Mary Ann, m. Nancy L. Hamlin on 25 Sep 1851 in Pontotoc Co.  The family moved on to Dunklin Co., MO.  Several of their sons became prominent in local affairs.

CENSUS YR: 1850
STATE: MS
COUNTY: PONTOTOC
REEL NO: M432-360 PAGE NO: 93 HOUSEHOLD: 535
REFERENCE: 23RD DAY OF SEPTEMBER 1850, ANDREW J. CLARK ASS’T MARSHAL
________________________________________________

HARKEY DANIEL 53 M FARMER 1,880 NC
HARKEY MA 48 F GA (1)
HARKEY DANIEL 9 M FARMER GA (2)
HARKEY HIRAM 15 M GA
HARKEY WELLBORNE 13 M GA
HARKEY NEWTON 12 M GA (3)
HARKEY NEWSOM 12 M GA (3)
HARKEY FRANCIS 8 M GA
HARKEY JASPER 7 M GA

(1) Mary Ann (Bankston) Harkey

(2) Daniel Harkey married in Pontotoc Co. in 1851, so he wasn’t 9 in 1850. This is probably an error in the transcription, and he was actually 19.

(3) Twins

(Detail of 1850 Pontotoc Co., MS Federal Census.)

[Detail from the 1860 Dunklin Co., MO Federal Census showing Mary Ann (Bankston) Harkey next door to her son Samuel Jones Harkey, a Methodist minister.  Also in his household is a school teacher.  Click on image to enlarge it.]

Daniel and Mary had nine sons:  Samuel Jones Harkey, Methodist minister; William M. Harkey, state legislator; Daniel D. Harkey; Hiram W. Harkey; Wilburn David Harkey (buried at Cude Cemetary, Senath, MO); Newsom A. Harkey; Newton O. Harkey (twin of Newsom A. Harkey); Francis M. “Nugg” Harkey, judge; and Jasper H. “Jap” Harkey (buried at Cude Cemetary, Senath, MO).  Wilburn David Harkey and Jasper H. Harkey were active Masons.

I shot this series of tombstone photos about 1990 at Liberty Cemetary near Caruth in Dunklin Co., MO.  The tombstones are in deplorable condition.  Those of Daniel David Harkey, Newton O. Harkey, and Amanda M. (Kimbrow) Harkey are cracked.  I was able to locate both pieces of Newton and Amanda’s tombstones, and put them back together to take photos.  Often tombstones that are difficult to photograph can be read in person.

(Click on images to enlarge them.)

(Daniel David Harkey, b. Mar. 25, 1797 in NC, d. Jun. 25, 1858 in Dunklin Co., MO.)

[Mary A. (Bankston) Harkey, wife of Daniel David Harkey, b. Sep. 25, 1801 in Wilkes Co., GA, d. Mar. 7, 1879 in Dunklin Co., MO.  This grave is unusual because there’s a footstone reading “Mary A.” (see below).]

[Newton O. Harkey, son of Daniel David and Mary A. (Bankston) Harkey, b. Nov. 22, 1838 in Pike Co., GA, d. Feb. 2, 1880 of malaria in Dunklin Co.]

[Amanda M. (Kimbrow) Harkey, wife of Newton O. Harkey, b. Dec. 26, 1843 in MO, d. Sep. 7, 1901 in Dunklin Co.  Amanda was the daughter of William and Annie Bradford (Branch) Kimbrow.  William Kimbrow was an early Dunklin Co. sheriff.]

[Hiram W. Harkey, son of Daniel David and Mary A. (Bankston) Harkey, b. 1835, d. Nov. 8, 1856.  Although the year of birth is plainly visible, the month and day of birth weren’t legible.]

DIRECTIONS TO LIBERTY CEMETERY NEAR CARUTH, MO:

From Kennett (county seat of Dunklin Co., MO), take HWY 412 S to HWY Y, at County Rd 549C turn right.  Cemetery can be seen from HWY Y before the turn off.  I don’t know if the tombstones I photographed remain in situ in recognizable condition.

BLACK OF CHAMPAIGN CO., OH & HENRY CO., IA / FRANCIS IRONS JEFFERY & THE MARRYING WIDOW / STAFFORD, HANAWALT, LAMAN & ROTHROCK: A PENNSYLVANIA DUTCH REVOLUTIONARY WAR HERITAGE

•August 10, 2017 • Comments Off on BLACK OF CHAMPAIGN CO., OH & HENRY CO., IA / FRANCIS IRONS JEFFERY & THE MARRYING WIDOW / STAFFORD, HANAWALT, LAMAN & ROTHROCK: A PENNSYLVANIA DUTCH REVOLUTIONARY WAR HERITAGE

Revised Aug. 30, 2016

Schwieder, Dorothy.  (1996).  Iowa The Middle Land.  Ames, Iowa:  Iowa State University Press.

The Black family of Champaign Co., OH, and Henry Co., IA were ancestors of my grandfather Jesse Otto Jeffery Scarff.  Samuel Black Jr. served in the Civil War in Co. H, 37th (“Graybeard”) Regiment, Iowa Infantry, enlisting at age 54, which in that era was considered an advanced age.  Most of the deaths in the unit were from disease.

The Black family, like those below, was of German descent.

Below: Grave marker of Samuel Black Jr. (1808–1865) at Green Mound cemetery near Trenton, Henry Co., IA.  The stone has tipped over and is flat on the ground.  Note the GAR star at the bottom right.  Trenton, named after the capital of New Jersey, was once a viable community, but the railroads at Fairfield were stiff competition.

On 3 Jul 1831 in Champaign Co., OH Samuel Black Jr. married Mary Adamson.  Of her family I have nothing.  Like her husband, she’s buried at Green Mound cemetery.  The clasping hands are a common motif on grave markers of the period.

“The Free Press” of 18 Aug 1887, published in Mt. Pleasant, Iowa reports: “Mrs. Mary Black died at her residence two miles west of here, July 15th.  She was born in Ohio in 1814, and after her marriage to Samuel Black, moved to Henry county Iowa, where she resided for forty-eight years.  She was a kind good woman and died respected by her neighbors.”  Her grave marker says she died July 11th.

Samuel Black Jr.’s daughter Mary Ann married Tyler Huffman, who was also a Civil War veteran, on 3 Sep 1868 in Henry Co., IA.  Their daughter Effie Viola Huffman became Jesse’s mother.

Above: Portrait of Effie Viola Huffman, probably taken prior to her marriage to Earnest Ervin Jeffery. 

Below: Effie is buried at Green Mound cemetery.  Her grave marker has been recently installed.

Above: Grave marker of Samuel Black Sr. (1775–1846) at Black Cemetery, Woodstock, Champaign Co., OH; father of Samuel Black Jr. of Henry Co., IA. Samuel Black Sr. married in Washington Co. PA, Elizabeth Stricker, daughter of Lawrence (Johan Lorentz) Stricker.  (See: Lawrence Stricker will, dated 1 Apr 1816, Washington Co. PA Will Book 3, p. 93 which names “my daughter Elizabeth Black wife to Samuel Black.”)  In 1811 Samuel Black Sr. moved from Buffalo Township, Washington Co., PA to Champaign Co., OH.

(Will of Samuel Black Sr., Champaign Co., OH Will Book B, pp. 413–414.)

Samuel Black Sr. was the son of Peter Black of Washington Co., PA.  Peter Black was a soldier in the Revolutionary War.

This NEXT cluster of families also belongs to my grandfather Jesse Otto Jeffery Scarff. It’s a new cluster stemming from his grandmother Catherine (Stafford) Jeffery.  I discovered the maiden name of Catherine’s mother Susan by taking another look at the cemetery records at Lower Richwoods Cemetery in Jefferson Co., IA, which show Susan’s maiden name as Hanawalt.  I was then able to identify Susan’s family in Mifflin County, PA.

I still haven’t determined the parents of Susan’s husband James Stafford, who was born 8 Jul 1792 in England.  James Stafford must have married Susan (or Susannah) Hanawalt in Mifflin Co., PA. Unfortunately there are no marriage records there until 1885, and this marriage took place ca. 1831.

James Stafford’s tombstone at Lower Richwoods Cemetery is still standing.  Also buried at Lower Richwoods Cemetery is George Hanawalt (23 Apr 1795–22 Jul 1867), brother of Susan (Hanawalt) Stafford.

_____

In the 1850 Jefferson Co., IA census (p. 41), Susanna Stafford is living in Walnut Township, as follows:

Susanna Stafford aged 43 b. PA; Mary Stafford aged 17 b. PA; Henry Stafford aged 15 b. PA; Annette Stafford aged 11 b. PA; Catharine Stafford aged 9 b. PA; Nelson Stafford aged 7 b. PA (Nelson’s full name was Admiral Nelson Stafford)

By the 1860 Jefferson Co., IA census (pp. 136-147), the family is still in Walnut Township, but things have changed a bit:

Household 978:  Oliver Frazier aged 23 b. NY; Catharine Frazier aged 19 b. PA  (Catherine Stafford and her first husband, Oliver Frazier, living next door to Catherine’s mother, before the Civil War.  “Frazier” is sometimes spelled “Frasher.”)

Household 979:  Susan Stafford aged 52 b. PA; Henry Stafford aged 24 b. PA; Athena Stafford aged 21 b. PA; Nelson Stafford aged 17 b. PA; John Stafford aged 10 months b. IA

In the 1870 Henry Co., IA census (p. 247), Catherine Stafford is residing in Jefferson Township, Mt. Pleasant P.O. with her new husband:

Francis A. [sic] Jeffery aged 31 b. OH; Catherine E. Jeffery aged 28 b. PA; James P. Frasher [sic] aged 9 b. IA; Eva Jane Jeffery aged 4 b. IA; William Jeffery aged 2 b. IA; Thomas Jeffery aged 7 months b. IA; Garret I. Jeffery aged 66 b. NJ

The 1880 Henry Co., IA census (p. 194), Jefferson Township, shows that Francis I. Jeffery had adopted James P. Frazier, Catherine Jeffery’s son by her first husband.  This census also documents the relationships in the household.  “Jeffery” has been corrupted to “Jeffries”:

F.I. Jeffries [sic] aged 42 b. OH; Catharine Jeffries (wife) aged 39 b. PA; James P. Jeffries (son) aged 19 b. IA; Wm. Jeffries (son) aged 11 b. IA; Thomas S. Jeffries (son) aged 10 b. IA; John L. Jeffries (son) aged 8 b. IA; Garit Jeffries (father) aged 76 b. NJ

Above: Grave marker of Francis Irons Jeffery at Green Mound cemetery.  The grave has a GAR (Grand Army of the Republic) star.  Beneath “GAR” is the legend “1861–1865.” Francis Irons Jeffery served as a corporal in the Union Army during the Civil War.  GAR was founded on 6 Apr 1866 in Decatur, IL by Benjamin F. Stephenson as a fraternal order for those who had served in the Union armed forces.  Its last member, drummer boy Albert Woolson, d. 2 Aug 1956, and was thought to be about 109 years old.  Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War is the GAR endorsed successor organization, which is still active today.  Estimates of those killed in the Civil War, from combat or disease, range from 620,000 to 750,000. 

Below: Francis Irons Jeffery’s grave marker was paid for by the Office of the Quartermaster General, which supplied through local contractors grave markers for thousands of Union veterans.  According to their records, he died on 20 June 1897.  The grave marker, being of porous stone, is in bad condition.  This record gives an accurate date of death.  The grave marker was actually installed nearly six years later.

By the 1900 Henry Co., IA census (SD 74 ED 33 Sheet 9), Jefferson Township, Catherine Jeffery is once again a widow:

Catherine Jeffry [sic] (widow, head of household) b. Nov 1844 PA; Wm. L. Jeffry (son) b. Jul 1876 IA; Alonzo Jeffry (son) b. – 1879 IA; Earnest Jeffry (son) b. Feb 1881 (Earnest Ervin Jeffery was father of my grandfather Jesse Otto Jeffery Scarff)

And finally, in the 1910 Henry Co., IA census (SD 1 ED 40 Sheet 11B), my grandfather is living with his aunt Emma and her husband John Scarff:

John H. Scarff (head) aged 45 b. IA; Emma A. (wife) aged 40 b. IA; Jesse Otto Jeffery (nephew) aged 6 b. IA (Jesse was Emma’s nephew, not John’s)

I wanted to solve the mystery of Catherine E. (Stafford) (Frazier) Jeffery’s first husband, Oliver E. Frazier.  What happened?

Oliver E. Frazier served in Co. K, 7th Regiment, Iowa Infantry.  After numerous battles throughout the South, the unit was attached to the Military Division of the Mississippi under the command of Maj. General William T. Sherman.  The Battle of Resaca, the first battle of Sherman’s Atlanta campaign, was fought from 13–15 May 1864 in Gordon and Whitfield counties, GA.  Oliver E. Frazier was killed at Resaca on 15 May 1864, and is interred at Chatanooga National Cemetery, Chatanooga, TN.  Cemetery records leave no doubt that the soldier interred at Chatanooga was Catherine’s husband Oliver.  Oliver never made it home in more ways than one.

(Battle of Resaca, by Kurz and Allison, 1889.  Kurz and Allison, based in Chicago, were a publisher of chromolithographs of Civil War battles and other historical events.  They would be found in Victorian era parlors of middle class homes.)

But how did Francis I. Jeffery, whose home was Henry Co., IA, marry a widow who resided in Jefferson Co.?  How did he know of her?  Francis was in Co. B, 25th Regiment, Iowa Infantry—and he fought at the Battle of Resaca.  Evidently Francis knew Oliver, and when he mustered out, he visited Catherine.

On 6 Sep 1866 in Jefferson Co., IA, Catherine E. Jeffery posted a Guardian’s bond for the benefit of James P. Frasher, a minor.  Witnesses were Henry Stafford and Daniel W. Benson.

Catherine was the widow of two Civil War veterans.  The pension claims stemming from the Civil War service of Oliver E. Frazier and her second husband Francis I. Jeffery were consolidated under her Widow’s claim No. 679.892.  Records show her son James P. (Frasher) Jeffery eventually received money through his father’s pension while residing at Fairfield, IA.

(Click on image to enlarge.)

____________________________________

Although it is known that Susan (Hanawalt) Stafford is buried at Lower Richwoods Cemetery, she doesn’t have a grave marker and her exact date of death is unknown. However, the 1870 Jefferson Co., IA census (p. 225), P.O. Lockridge, taken on 7 Jun 1870, shows Susan aged 64 living with her son Henry Stafford.

James and Susan (Hanawalt) Stafford’s son Admiral Nelson Stafford (2 Jan 1844—7 Jul 1919) moved to Polk Co., NE, where he resided at Stromsburg.  He drew Pension No. 212,777 for his Civil War service, and is buried in Stromsburg cemetery.

On 30 Nov 1844, for the sum of $500.00, Hugh Johnston and Leah his wife sold to James Stafford 160 acres in Jefferson Co.  William Kimberly and George Hanawalt were witnesses to the deed.  On 1 Mar 1846, the United States of America issued land grant No. 11397 for 40 acres to James Stafford of Jefferson Co., Territory of Iowa.

Below: Grave marker of James Stafford at Lower Richwoods cemetery, Jefferson Co., IA.  At some point the grave marker was split, and has been repaired with iron bands.

James and Susan (Hanawalt) Stafford were real Iowa pioneers.  The following, cited in a 1914 history of Jefferson Co., IA, are part of the field notes submitted on 18 Nov 1837 by E.F. Lucas, Deputy Surveyor, which describes conditions in Walnut Township when James and Susan settled in Iowa Territory:

“It may be said of this township that it embraces a considerable quantity of good soil, and to all appearance well adapted to the purpose of cultivation, good timber for the support of farms is not in that abundance that would be looked for in all cases, but yet, there is a sufficiency.

There passes through the center and out at the South Boundry a Creek called Wallnut which a great portion of the year will be sufficient to propel mills and other machinery.  There are great quantities of Limestone disposed through out, and from appearance stone coal may be easily procured in large quantities.  It is perceveable in the washings of all the brooks Creeks, etc.  On the N. boundary is what is called the Pleasant Prairie.  But of the river bottoms nothing flattering can be held out—they are not wide in most places—and the numerous ponds, and lakes and marshes spoil them either for beauty or cultivation.”

Mifflin Co. is in the central section of PA.  These individuals are of German descent and considered “Pennsylvania Dutch” (“deutsch”).  Any descendant of James and Susan (Hanawalt) Stafford is eligible for DAR on three lines, as discussed below.  All lines have been used for DAR membership.

  1. Johannes Rothrock, b. 1684 in Leiselheim, Germany (in the Rhineland near Worms); m. 1712 Anna Margaretha (maiden name unknown), b. 1688, liv. 1730; Johannes Rothrock said to be son of Michel Rothrock

     

  2. Johann Georg Rothrock, b. 1721 in Germany, d. 1806 in Northampton Co., PA; m. Elizabeth Roemig, d. 1798; Johann Georg Rothrock (George Rothrock) signed an Oath of Allegiance to the United States on 29 May 1778, NSDAR qualified (Ancestor No. A098781); according to NSDAR wife was Elizabeth Roemig, parents unknown

     

  3. George Rothrock, b. 1747 in Bucks Co., PA, d. 1 May 1826 in Derry Township, Mifflin Co., PA; m. Elizabeth (Myers or Meyers?), b. 1751, d. Jul 1827, Mifflin Co, PA; George Rothrock served in Battalion 8 Cumberland Co., PA militia during the Revolutionary War, NSDAR qualified (Ancestor No. A098782); NSDAR doesn’t give a maiden name for wife

     

  4. Mary Rothrock, twin of Susanna Rothrock, b. 24 Dec 1773 in Cumberland Co., PA, d. 1840 in Mifflin Co., PA; m. ca. 1793 in Mifflin Co., PA, John Laman Hanawalt, b. 1773 at or near McVeytown, Mifflin Co., PA, d. 22 Feb 1829 in McVeytown, Mifflin Co., PA; John Laman Hanawalt was the son of Henry George Hanawalt and Catherine Elizabeth Laman (or Lehman); Henry [George] Hanawalt, ca. 1731–1794, is NSDAR qualified (Ancestor No. A050781) for rendering Patriotic Service (paid Supply Tax 1779–1782) 

     

  5. Susan (or Sussanah) Hanawalt, b. 1807, d. after 7 Jun 1870 in Jefferson Co., IA; m. ca. 1831 in Mifflin Co., PA, James Stafford, b. 8 Jul 1792 in England, d. 8 July 1847 in Jefferson Co, IA; James and Susan (Hanawalt) Stafford are buried in Lower Richwoods Cemetery in Jefferson Co., IA; Susan has no marker

     

  6. Catherine E. Stafford (middle name probably “Elizabeth”), b. November 1842 in Pennsylvania, d. 23 Oct 1902 in Henry Co., IA; m. (2) 12 Apr 1866 as his second wife, Francis Irons Jeffery, b. 21 Aug 1838 in Marion Co., OH, d. 20 Jun 1897 in Henry Co., IA, Union Civil War veteran, buried Green Mound Cemetery near Trenton, IA, son of Garrett Irons Jeffery and wife Ann McCray; Catherine’s first husband Oliver E. Frazier was killed in the Civil War, and by him she had one son, James P. Frazier

NEW YORK STORIES (before the wall)

•August 6, 2017 • Comments Off on NEW YORK STORIES (before the wall)

 

(Click on images to enlarge them.)

Shorto, Russell.  (2005).  The Island At The Center Of The World The Epic Story Of Dutch Manhattan And The Forgotten Colony That Shaped America.  New York:  Vintage Books A Division of Random House, Inc.

According to Shorto, Sarah Rapalje, born in 1625, daughter of Joris Rapalje and Catalina Trico, claimed to be the “first born christian daughter of New Netherland” in what is now New York City. (p. 41)

Sarah Rapalje may have been the first daughter born in the colony, but the following item shows she wasn’t the first child:

“Our information upon this point is derived from the Journal of the Labadist missionaries, Danker and Sluyter, who visited New York in 1679.  While in town they lodged with one Jacob Hellekers, the site of whose house is now occupied by the building No. 255, Pearl St., near Fulton St.  They were therefore near neighbors to Jan Vinje, with whom they soon became acquainted.  He was then, they tell us, about sixty-five years of age, a prominent man, well known to all the citizens, many of whom had themselves resided in the town and had been intimately acquainted with him for from thirty to forty years. It was the common understanding that he was the first person born in the colony, and the date of his birth would therefore go back to the year 1614.  His parents, so the Labadists inform us, were Guillaume Vigne, and his wife Adrienne Cuville, from Valenciennes in France.  How they came to be at New Amsterdam in the early days of the trading-post we do not know, but there is certainly nothing improbable in the assertion that a trader or officer of the post should have had his family with him at New Amsterdam.  In the mouths of their Dutch neighbors, the husband became known as Willem Vinje, and his wife as Adriana Cuvilje.  There is reason to believe that Willem Vinje was the first tenant of the farm laid out north of the present Wall St. by the West India Company, and that he died there.  In 1632 his widow married Jan Jansen Damen, with whom the farm is more generally associated.  At the date last named, as we are informed by an instrument in the Albany records, of the four children of Willem Vinje and his wife, two were married, Maria (to Abraham Verplanck), and Christina (to Dirck Volckertsen), while two, Rachel and Jan, were ‘minors’; as both of the latter, however, were married within the next six years (Rachel to the Secretary Van Tienhoven), they must have been in the latter years of their minority in 1632, and the age of Jan Vinje, according to the Labadists, which would have been seventeen or eighteen at that time, is thus confirmed.” 

Hoff, Henry B., ed.  (1987).  Genealogies of Long Island Families From The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record Volume I Albertson—Polhemius.  Baltimore:  Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. (p. 280)

The Labadists were followers of Jean de Labadie (1610–1674), a former Jesuit priest, leader of a French Protestant movement.

Christina Vigne, sister to Jan Vigne, married Dirck Volckertsen (or Holgerson), a Norwegian.  They were 2nd great-grandparents of Abraham Fulkerson.  He was born 1739 and baptized at the Readington (New Jersey) Dutch Reformed Church on 18 May 1740, the youngest child of Volkert Volkerse and Dinah van Lieuvin (daughter of Frederick Van Leeuwen and Dinah Jans).

See this website for a transcription of the will of Abraham Fulkerson’s grandfather: http://www.fulkerson.org/derrickwill.html

Abraham Fulkerson served in the Revolutionary War as a private in Lt. Reese Bowen’s Company, Washington Co., VA militia under Col. William Campbell, and saw action at the Battle of King’s Mountain, South Carolina, on 7 Oct 1780.  His home, built about 1783 in present-day Scott Co., VA is in the National Register of Historic Places.

A superb website about Abraham Fulkerson is:  http://www.fulkerson.org/abraham.html

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My line to Dirck Volkertsen is as follows:

(1) DIRCK HOLGERSON/VOLKERTSEN m. CHRISTINE VIGNE (dau. of Guillame Vigne & Adrienne Cuvelier)  (2) VOLKERT DIRCKSE b. 15 Nov 1643 m. ANNETJE PHILLIPS (dau. of Phillip Langelans)  (3) DIRCK VOLKERSE b. 1667 m. 27 Sep 1691 MARIA DEWITT (dau. of Peter De Witt & Sarah Albertse) (4) VOLKERT VOLKERSE b. 1692 m. DINAH VAN LIEUVIN b. 9 Dec 1694 (dau. of Frederick Van Leeuwen & Dinah Jans)  (5) ABRAHAM FULKERSON bp. 18 May 1740 d. ca. Apr 1822 m. 2 Jul 1766 in Rowan Co. NC SARAH GIBSON  (6) ELIZABETH FULKERSON m. PEYTON WILCOX  (7) PEYTON MILTON WILCOX m. MINERVA JANE DUNCAN (dau. of Joseph Duncan & Elizabeth Peters)

Abstracted from:

Thompson, Laila Fulkerson.  (1979).  A History Of The Fulkerson Family From 1630 To The Present (in two volumes).   Bakersfield, CA:  The Author.

The New Netherland Project of the New Netherland Institute is translating 12,000 pages of documents relating to the Dutch colony:

http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/

This is a great website for those interested in exploring New York before it was New York.

Who was James Edward Chipman? / William & Milly (Standifer) Chipman’s Family / Cynthia or Sarah: Who was James Edward Chipman’s Mother? / Lauderdale Co., TN Tax Lists / Who were the Wilborns? / Miller Excursus/ James Edward Chipman’s siblings: Cynthia Ann (Chipman) Koonce of Lauderdale Co., TN & Benjamin Chipman of Blytheville, AR

•July 23, 2017 • Comments Off on Who was James Edward Chipman? / William & Milly (Standifer) Chipman’s Family / Cynthia or Sarah: Who was James Edward Chipman’s Mother? / Lauderdale Co., TN Tax Lists / Who were the Wilborns? / Miller Excursus/ James Edward Chipman’s siblings: Cynthia Ann (Chipman) Koonce of Lauderdale Co., TN & Benjamin Chipman of Blytheville, AR

Over the years I’ve been fortunate to correspond with people who provided information about my family from personal knowledge.   This case concerns the mother of my great-grandfather James Edward Chipman (1879–1956).

(James Edward Chipman married Allie May Oxley on 25 Dec 1901.)

James Edward Chipman’s father was known to be Joe Chipman.  Family tradition held that his mother was Cynthia Miller.  That assertion found its way into his obituary in The Dunklin Democrat of Kennett, MO for 9 Feb 1956 (his wife was Allie—not Ollie—Oxley; a second obituary in the same issue corrected the names of his children):

The first record I have in Dunklin Co. MO for James Edward (“Ed”) Chipman is this entry in the 1900 Dunklin Co., MO census (Series T623, Roll 853, p.4), which shows him living with his cousin Charles Monroe (“CM” or “Charley”) Chipman:

Charley Chipman was James Edward Chipman’s cousin, but also a close friend.  Charley Chipman was the son of Thomas Jefferson Chipman and wife Nancy Tennessee Manning.  Nancy was called “Tennie.”

There were two Thomas Jefferson Chipmans in Lauderdale Co., TN:  one the son of William Chipman, and the other the son of William Chipman’s brother George Chipman.

(Thomas Jefferson Chipman, 1846–1930, son of William Chipman.)

The above is the death certificate of Charley Chipmans’s father Thomas Jefferson Chipman, whose own father is given  as William Chipman.  The next death certificate, which belongs to Thomas Jefferson Chipman’s brother Benjamin F. Chipman, adds another piece of information:  the mother’s maiden name is shown as “Stanford.” “Stanford” is a corruption of “Standifer,” which was also rendered as “Standefer,” “Standford,” and “Standiford.”

Of William Chipman’s wife Milly (Standifer) Chipman, I have this from the National Archives and Records Administration, which shows that Nancy (Echols) Standifer died in 1864, and was survived by her children Joshua Standifer, Sarah Howard, Milly Chipman, and Leroy Standifer.  The letter is part of the Revolutionary War pension file of Milly’s father Benjamin Standifer, who died in Bledsoe Co., TN on 13 Mar 1839.

William Chipman didn’t leave a will or estate.  He had mortgaged his farm in exchange for supplies and was unable to pay off the note.  He had nothing to pass on to his children. The irony is that William Chipman, unlike his brothers George Chipman and Washington Chipman, was not a slave owner.  And yet Reconstruction was a disaster for William, but his brothers sailed through it.

Let’s return to the primary focus of this piece:  was James Edward Chipman’s mother really Cynthia Miller?

Actually, her name was Sarah A. Miller.  And a correspondent from Lauderdale Co., TN, where the Millers lived, furnished the proof.  The “Cynthia” under discussion here is Cynthia Ann Chipman, sister of James Edward Chipman.

This is excellent evidence from someone who knew the Koonce family intimately, being related to it by marriage.  Bessie Koonce’s husband was the nephew of John Bennett Koonce, and John Bennet Koonce was Cynthia’s husband.  Like many Southerners, John Bennett Koonce used his middle name.

On page 2, Bessie Koonce states a relationship between Cynthia and Wes Miller:  Wes Miller was Cynthia’s uncle.  How can we use this information to conclusively establish the identity of James Edward Chipman’s mother?

The 1880 Lauderdale Co., TN census (p. 40, SD 5, ED 84) shows Howard Miller with a son named Wesley.  Wes Miller was Cynthia’s uncle, so Howard Miller was Cynthia’s grandfather.  Therefore, Cynthia’s mother had to be a daughter of Howard Miller.

Howard Miller didn’t have a daughter named Cynthia, but he did have a daughter named Sarah, as shown in the 1870 Lauderdale Co., TN census (p. 595):

(Sarah’s brother William E. “Billy” Miller had married Mary Ann Chipman, daughter of William Chipman, on 6 Oct 1867, and wasn’t present in Howard Miller’s household in 1870.  He was present in Howard Miller’s household in 1860.)

Joseph Chipman (middle initial “H”) was the son of William Chipman.  The Chipmans lived near the Millers, as this 1870 Lauderdale Co, TN census entry shows (p. 595):

Sarah A. Miller married Joseph Chipman.  W.E. “Billy” Miller was the bondsman:

(Actual marriage record.  Click on image to enlarge it.)

Joseph Chipman named his eldest son Benjamin after his brother Benjamin, his daughter Cynthia Ann after his sister Cynthia, and his youngest child James Edward after his grandfather James.  James Washington Chipman, son of William Chipman’s brother George Chipman, was Joseph Chipman’s first cousin; their descendants were close friends as the families moved further south into Arkansas.

Joseph Chipman is listed in the 1880 Lauderdale Co., TN Agricultural census as farming 15 acres of rented land  in District 6.  Like many Southerners, he struggled in the aftermath of the Civil War.

Sarah A. (Miller) Chipman didn’t live to see her three children become adults.  According to James Edward Chipman’s medical records, she died of pneumonia.  On 29 Jun 1881, Joseph Chipman (“Jo” is an abbreviation of “Joseph”) married Addie Osteen.  Joseph Chipman’s brother Benajmin F. Chipman was the bondsman.  There was no issue of the marriage.

(Actual marriage record.  Click on image to enlarge it.)

So who was Addie Osteen?  Adaline Osteen, age 16 (born in 1864) was residing with her aunt Jane Singleton in the 6th District of Lauderdale Co.  (1880 Lauderdale Co., TN Federal Census, p. 163). The 1870 Federal Census (p. 591) shows Adaline as the daughter of William and Cathy Osteen residing in the 6th District.  Addie was no more than 18 years old when she married Joseph Chipman. Joseph Chipman was typical of men in rural communities—he didn’t look far afield for a wife.

Thus far, the family history is well documented, but there’s one loose end:  what happened to Joseph Chipman?

In the late 1980s, I visited the Lauderdale Co., TN courthouse in Ripley.  I asked a clerk about the county’s old tax records.  I was directed to a room in the basement.  There I found old tax books in no particular order, and leafed through them, copying the names of various Chipmans who had lived in the county.  I managed to locate the books for 1873, 1875, 1877–1881, and 1888–1889.  I found Joseph Chipman in the 1875, and 1877–1881 Tax Lists.  Sometimes he was listed as “Joe,” and sometimes just “Jo.”  The 1881 Tax List reported him in District 6.  And that’s the last record I have for Joseph Chipman in Lauderdale County, but I did not examine Tax Lists for 1882–1887.  By 1880, all of Joseph Chipman’s three children had been born.

These notes were taken directly from the tax books.  I don’t know if the tax books still exist or where they are now.

When Sarah A. (Miller) Chipman died, as was often the case the children were sent to live with relatives.  A widower could not work and take care of small children.  Second wives, especially those as young as Addie,  might balk at caring for children who weren’t hers.  Benjamin, Cynthia Ann, and James Edward lived for a time with Joseph Chipman’s sister Mary Ann, who had married William E. “Billy” Miller in Lauderdale Co. on 6 Oct 1867.  After Billy Miller died on 10 May 1884, the children were placed with Joseph Chipman’s brother Thomas Jefferson Chipman.  Tom Chipman resented taking care of three more children, and made certain the children knew it.

Joseph Chipman never returned for his children.  According to James Edward Chipman’s medical records, Joseph Chipman died in 1888 of grippe (an archaic term for “influenza”), a highly contagious viral disease that produces a fever.

Therefore, the following deed is not that of James Edward Chipman’s father.  In Madison County, TN, on 1 Jan 1892, “Joe Chipman” purchased a tract of 80 acres from W.C. Pipkin.  W.C. Pipkin was William Clark Pipkin, a grandson of Washington Chipman.  The terms of the sale were these:  Joe Chipman promised to pay a series of 7 installments of $150.00 each, every 1 Jan from 1892 to 1898.  After Pipkin received the installments for 1892 and 1893, he registered the deed:

I conducted a thorough search of records in Madison Co., but could not locate another deed or any probate papers for this individual.  The deed belongs to Jos Chipman who married Hattie Dunlap on 8 Jan 1881 in Madison Co., TN.  They were African-American.

Family tradition isn’t always accurate and should be verified with facts.  In this instance, family tradition correctly identified the surname of James Edward Chipman’s mother, but was in error regarding her given name—an error repeated in the letter that follows. Why was Sarah A. (Miller) Chipman known as “Cynthia”?  Sometimes a woman didn’t like her given name and took another.  In the specific case of this family, there was a precedent: Sarah’s mother Leitha (Hargis) Miller also went by the name of “Caroline.”

This photo was obtained by Ralph Vernon Chipman during a visit to Ripley, TN.  The photo is of William Mack Chipman (right) with son “Fletcher,” although I’m not certain that was the son’s name.  William Mack Chipman was a grandson of William Chipman (1814–1874).

(Notes by Ralph Vernon Chipman.)

This excerpt is from a letter dated 12 Oct 1962 from Ruby (Bohannon) Chipman, wife of Jewell Vester Chipman (brother of my grandfather Beecher Edgar Chipman) to Pauline Aquilla (Chipman) Page and her husband Carl Davis Page.  In the transcription that follows, I’ve left the spelling errors intact.  “Papa Chipman” is James Edward Chipman.

“The new clipping you sent was quite  interesting because when we attended Charley Chipman sisters funeral  at Ripley Tenn. When we were living at West Memphis we meet some  Drumwrights they are apart of Papa Chipman family.

Papa Chipmans mother was a Cynthia  Miller and the Millers at Kennett and Cardwell are his relatives also  the Wilborns at Senath and Cardwell but I do not know how the  Wilborns are connected.  Charley Chipmans sister married Frank Miller  and she was Mollie Chipman.  She still lives at Kennett.  While we  were at W. Memphis we went to visit Jewells cousins at Ripley and  Memphis.  They are aunt Cynthia Koons or (Coons) children Duprie,  Gertrude ? And Mrs. Cecil B. Keltner 645 Pope.  (This is Lily Mae  Koons)  They seemed to hardly remember you all and we didn’t find  much in common to talk about.

The one in Memphis was much easier to  talk to and seemed glad that we came.  We visited her after we had  visited the others and perhaps they had told her about our visit and  she had time to think.  The others were taken by supprise.”

It’s not the Miller family that interests me here.  I puzzled over the reference to “the Wilborns” for some time, and then I discovered this in A Chipman Genealogy (1970) pp. 69–70, in the biography of John Chipman of Guilford Co., NC.  The line as given by John Hale Chipman III was not entirely correct:  John Chipman was the son of Paris (or Perez) Chipman Jr., but Paris Chipman Jr.’s parents were James and Mary (Minor) Chipman.  The rest of the line is accurate.  Our ancestors frequently spelled phonetically and Paris was pronounced “Perez” as in a southern drawl. 

I found the answer to the puzzle in 107–iii:  “Deborah Chipman b. Nov. 3, 1787; m. Moses Wilborn.”  John Chipman of Guilford Co., NC and James Chipman of Bledsoe Co., TN were first cousins.  Note that John Chipman was born in Kent Co., DE, as was my 4th great-grandfather James Chipman. John Chipman and James Chipman would have known each other.  James Chipman was about 13 years old when at age 23 John Chipman moved to Guilford Co., NC.  My 3rd great-grandfather William Chipman (1814–1874) was Deborah (Chipman) Wilborn’s second cousin.

Back in the late 1980s I exchanged a series of letters with Robert L. Shearer, a descendant of John Jump.  John Jump allegedly had a daughter named Nancy who married John Chipman of Grant Co., KY.  Robert, author of Jump Genealogy, proved that John Jump wasn’t from Guilford Co., NC—and he sent me a copy of this letter, now 25 years old, which is quite helpful.  It shows that Deborah (Chipman) Wilborn died in MO.

The notes are a little hard to read, so I’ve transcribed them:

HER CHART

26.  Dauphin Perkins b. Sep 1809 OH d. 24 Nov 1893 m. 15 Sep 1849

27.  Caroline Welborn b. 22 Apr 1829 NC

54.  Moses Welborn b. 9 July 1783 Rowan Co. NC d. 11 Jan 1851

55.  Deborah Chipman b. 8 Nov 1787 Guilford Co. NC d. 18 Sept 1872

110.  John Chipman b. 24 Mar 1761

111.  Mary (Harris) b. 23 May 1761

Some sources say Deborah (Chipman) Wilborn died on 17 Sep 1871 in Pilot Point, TX.  This is an example of a specific, though wrong, date of death, and wrong place of death. How did that happen?  The bible record is preferred over other sources.  Deborah (Chipman) Wilborn actually died a year later, and is buried in a family cemetery in DeKalb Co., MO.

__________________________________________________________

Serendipity:  the discovery of something fortunate; the accidental discovery of something pleasant, valuable, or useful.

___________________________________________

FAMILY OF CYNTHIA ANN (CHIPMAN) KOONCE, SISTER OF JAMES EDWARD CHIPMAN (1879-1956)

I don’t have many records on the Koonce family.  James Edward Chipman’s sister Cynthia Ann (Sinthy) Chipman married John Bennett Koonce on 7 Dec 1895 in Lauderdale Co., TN.

According to her death certificate, Sinthy died on 1 Dec 1926 at Central, in Lauderdale Co.  When I visited Ripley, TN about 20 years ago, I stopped by the local newspaper, and found this brief obituary in “The Lauderdale Co. Enterprise”  3 Dec 1926, p. 5:

“Mrs. J.B. Koonce died Wednesday at her home near Central after an illness of several weeks.  She is survived by two children.  Her husband died a few months ago.  Her remains were laid to rest in Mt. Pleasant cemetary Thursday morning.”

The children of John Bennett and Cynthia Ann (Chipman) Koonce were:

Dupree D. (Dewey) Koonce b. 28 Oct 1898 d. 21 Jun 1972; Edna Gertrude Koonce b. 1902; Lily Mae Koonce b. 1908; Ethel Koonce b. 1911; Imogene Koonce b. 1915; and William Koonce.

MILLER EXCURSUS

The 1880 Lauderdale Co., TN Federal Census lists Howard Miller living in District 7, p. 186:

Howard Miller 66 b. NC (widower, deceased wife b. LA), Jane 20 b. TN (dau.), Ellen 15 b. TN (dau.), Millage 17 b. TN (son), Wesley 7. b. TN (son), Margaret A. 4 b. TN (granddaughter).

The 1870 Lauderdale Co., TN Federal Census lists Howard Miller in District 7, p. 595:

Howard Miller 57 b. NC, Caroline 48 b. FLA, Sarah 21 b. TN, Mary 17 b. TN, Jane 12 b. TN, James 9 b. TN, Miledge 6 b. TN, Ellen 4 b. TN

Joseph H. Chipman married Sarah A. Miller on 31 Aug 1873 in Lauderdale Co.  Sarah was born in Shelby Co., TN, where she’s listed with her parents, Howard M. and [Leitha] Caroline Miller in the 1850 Shelby Co. Federal Census, p. 258.  Philip B. Hargis was residing in an adjacent household.

Howard Miller married Leitha Caroline Hargis on 20 Jun 1844 in Shelby Co.   By 1859, the family had moved to Lauderdale Co., when on 3 Oct 1859, Howard Miller mortgaged his cotton crop and a two horse waggon to B.M. Flippin (Lauderdale Co., TN Deed Book H, p. 356).

The 1860 Lauderdale Co., TN Federal Census lists Howard Miller in District 7, p. 371:

Howard Miller 46 b. NC, Lethe 33 b. GA, Frances 15 b. TN, William 13 b. TN, Sarah 11 b. TN, Emiline 9 b. TN, John 7 b. TN, Alexina 5 b. TN, Mary 3 b. TN, Eliza 1 b. TN (This record shows that Leitha Caroline Hargis was born in GA in 1827.  Philip B. Hargis was living in Randolph Co., GA in 1830.)

The 1850 Shelby Co., TN Federal Census lists Howard M. Miller on p. 130A:

Howard M. Miller 23 b. NC, Caroline 20 b. GA, Frances 5 b. TN, Wm. 4 b. TN, Sarah 1 b. TN

What fascinates me about Howard and Leitha Caroline (Hargis) Miller is this:  Howard’s wife was “Letha” when he married her in 1844, called herself “Caroline” in the 1850 Shelby Co. census, became “Lethe” again in 1860, and wound up as “Caroline” once more in 1870.  By 1880 she was deceased.  Presumably the angels sorted it all out when she presented herself at the gates of Heaven.

Leitha Caroline (Hargis) Miller was probably the daughter of Philip B. and Marian W. (Fincher) Hargis, who married 10 Oct 1820 in Burke Co., NC.  Philip B. Hargis was the son of Jonathan and Priscilla (Askew) Hargis, and a grandson of Shadrach Hargis (d. 25 Jan 1816), a Captain in the Revolutionary War.  Jonathan Hargis died in Tipton Co., TN on  14 Aug 1837.  The Hargis family was of colonial Maryland origin.

Philip B. Hargis had a son Milledge A. Hargis (living in Conway Co., AR in 1860), and Howard and Leitha Miller had a son Millage Miller.   It’s a very unusual name, and onomastic evidence in this instance is compelling.

On 16 Mar 1846 in Shelby Co., Howard Miller and P.B. Hargis witnessed the will of Polly Bennett (Shelby Co. Will Record C-1, pp. 338-339).  Philip B. Hargis was living as late as 24 Jan 1856, when he sold Levi Baldock his interest in a tract of land (Shelby Co., TN Deed Book 24, p. 618).  Except for Leitha Caroline (Hargis) Miller, all of Philip B. Hargis’s surviving children moved to Conway Co., AR.

Sally Hargis, a daughter of Jonathan and Priscilla (Askew) Hargis, married Hiram Miller 31 Mar 1821 in Burke Co., NC.  Howard Miller (born NC) doesn’t appear to be connected to any Miller family residing in Shelby Co. at the time, but Miller being a common name, I’ve been unable to further trace his ancestry.

________________________________________________

This is another family for which I have few records, but I have corresponded with Robert Craig, a grandson of Charles Samuel and Willie Edna (Chipman) Craig.

FAMILY OF BENJAMIN CHIPMAN (1874-1913), BROTHER OF JAMES EDWARD CHIPMAN (1879-1956)

Benjamin Chipman b. Nov 1874 in Virginia, d. 23 Dec 1913 in Blytheville, Mississippi Co., Arkansas, buried at Sawyer Cemetary in SE Blytheville (no marker).

Married 2 Mar 1899 in Mississippi Co., (her first) Annie Ashcraft, b. 12 Oct 1878, d. 18 Apr 1970 in Osceola, Arkansas.

[Obituary for Annie (Ashcraft) Chipman Wright, “The Courier News,” Blytheville, AR for 20 Apr 1970, p. 4.]

Children:

Willie Edna Chipman, b. 1 Apr 1900, d. 21 Jun 1980, m. Charles Samuel Craig

[Tombstone for Willie Edna (Chipman) Craig at Elmwood cemetery, Blytheville, AR.  Tombstone gives death date as 23 Jun 1980.]

Marvin Chipman, b. 10 Jul 1902, d. 25 Jul 1980, bur. at Mississippi Memorial Gardens in Osceola, AR; m. Jody Viola Raport

Gertie Chipman, b. 24 Apr 1904, d. 23 Sep 1980; according to mother’s obituary m. — Flanigan

John Chipman, b. 28 Jan 1906, d. 10 Jan 1987

(“The Courier News,” of Blytheville, AR.  There is a discrepancy: the family information I received indicates John David Chipman was 81 when he died.)

Joe Bill Chipman, b. 7 Mar 1908, d. 16 Nov 1973

(“The Courier-News” of Blytheville, AR, Saturday, November 17, 1973.)

Lillie Chipman, b. 5 Jun 1912, d. 22 Oct 1928

(“Blytheville, Ark. Courier News,” for Monday, 22 Oct. 1928, p. 2.)

Mollie P. Chipman, b. 8 Mar 1914 (posthumous), m. A. Marvin Humble

[Tombstone for Mollie P. (Chipman) Humble, Jonesboro Memorial Park cemetery, Craighead Co. AR.  Again, a departure from family information: here her birthdate is given as 7 Mar 1913.]

Annie (Ashcraft) Chipman married (2nd) Noah Wright.

Children:

Hazel Wright, b. 28 Apr 1918, d. 1967

Mabel Wright, b. 28 Apr 1919

__________________________________________________

A helpful website for Lauderdale Co. research is:

http://www.tngenweb.org/lauderdale/

THOMAS SCOTT JR., FREEMASONRY, AND MILLER CO., MO POLITICS / RACHEL JANE COULDN’T MAKE THE PHOTO OP

•July 19, 2017 • Comments Off on THOMAS SCOTT JR., FREEMASONRY, AND MILLER CO., MO POLITICS / RACHEL JANE COULDN’T MAKE THE PHOTO OP

(1861).  Journal And Proceedings Of The Missouri State Convention Held At Jefferson City And St. Louis March, 1861.  St. Louis:  George Knapp & Co., Printers And Binders. 

Freemasons have a long and distinguished history in the United States.  My 3rd great-grandfather Thomas Scott Jr.  (1816–1897), son of Thomas and Sarah (Mahurin) Scott, was a player in Missouri politics.  Scott was a member of Flatwoods Baptist church, and a member of Miller Co., MO Masonic Lodges in Linn Creek (Nos. 66 & 152), Mt. Pleasant (No. 139), and Tuscumbia (Nos. 169 & 437).

Thomas Scott Jr. and America (Stillwell) Scott had migrated to Miller Co., MO from Dubois Co., IN.

(“Thomas Scott Jur” means Thomas Scott Jr.)

[Tombstone for Richard Stillwell, probable father of America (Stillwell) Scott, located at Simmons Family cemetery near Holland in Dubois Co., IN.  The tombstone is quite unusual in that it has no dates.  The 1830 Greene Co., IN Federal census lists Richard Stillwell as aged 60–70, and thus born ca. 1760–1770.  Although the tombstone claims Richard Stillwell was a Capt. in the PA militia during the Revolutionary War, according to DAR that service actually belongs to another Richard Stillwell.  In the 1880 Miller Co., MO Federal census America stated both of her parents were born in NC.  A search of NC troops showed no Richard Stillwell served there.  Richard Stillwell is said to have died in 1836.  This stone was probably erected at a much later date and is inaccurate.]

Thomas Scott Jr. was the son of Thomas Scott Sr. (“Thomas Scott Ser” means Thomas Scott Sr.) and wife Sarah Mahurin:

(Ancestry.com transcription of 1850 Miller Co., MO Census, District 13, p. 445a, Family 533.)

Miller County was in the 27th Senatorial District.  Thomas Scott Jr. served as a Resident State Senator from 1858 to 1862.  He was elected Justice of the Miller County Court on 2 Aug 1860, and also served as a Justice of the Peace for Equality Township.

Wilson Milton Vaughan family from a photo dated ca. 1895.  On 11 Mar 1875 in Miller Co., MO, Wilson married Rachel Jane Scott, daughter of Thomas Scott, Jr. and wife America Stilwell.  Rachel d. on 30 Mar 1894.  Left to Right / Bottom Row: Lafe Vaughan, Floyd Vaughan; 2nd Row: Eric Lyman Vaughan, Wilson Milton Vaughan, Everett Vaughan; Top Row: Ethel Vaughan, Theron Vaughan, Teresa Vaughan.  Wilson Milton Vaughan, my 2nd great-grandfather, was a well-known character in Tuscumbia, MO and lived to be nearly 100.  He was the son of Joshua Vaughan and wife Betsy Birdsong.

 

In 1861 Scott was a representative to the Missouri State Convention and voted to keep Missouri in the Union.  He’s listed in the official roster of the Convention (p. 7) as born in Kentucky, age 44, Farmer, of Tuscumbia (county seat of Miller Co.).  In 1862 he was elected State Representative from Miller County and is listed in the Missouri House Journal.  

Scott studied law and he and Jacob Gantt had a law office in Tuscumbia.

[Thomas Scott Jr., (1816–1897).]

Scott supported the Liberal Republican Party which in 1872 unsuccessfully opposed the reelection of President Ulysses S. Grant by nominating newspaperman Horace Greeley. Greeley, who is credited with coining the phrase “Go West, young man” (although he may not have used those exact words), died before the electoral votes were counted.

Scott tried his hand at gold mining in CA.  There’s confusion as to when and where he located in CA. “Scott, Thomas” age 63 and b. in KY is found in the 1880 Placer Co., CA Federal Census, p. 42, SD 42, ED 72, Butcher Ranch Precinct, Household 527/527, residing as a boarder in the house of William Bennett.  Placer Co. is in northern CA bordering NV.

I have the text of a letter Scott wrote from U.S. Ranch, Cal., to Wilson Milton and Rachel Jane (Scott) Vaughan, dated 11 Jan 1880, in which he said:

“We have had the hardest winter so far that has ever been known in the country.  Ice has frozen two inches thick something never known before.”

According to a letter of Scott’s grandson, Everett Vaughan, dated 2 May 1952:

“Grandfather Scott also went to California…. He apparently had some trouble with his family, especially the boys.  He deeded each of the boys a farm and left for California without telling anyone he was going.  I recall his return, about 1886.  He came to our place and stayed there for a few months.  He then moved to Uncle Newt’s, where he died.  Uncle Newt then lived on what later was known as the Fogleman place, where we lived for a while once.”

Since Scott’s wife, America (Stilwell) Scott was yet living, it’s inferred that the couple’s marriage had soured.  That may have been the motive for his sudden departure to CA. 

This symbol found on the $1.00 bill is a testament to the Founding Fathers’ association with Freemasonry.  The “Eye” symbol and motto “Annuit Coeptis” are loosely translated as “Providence Favors Our Undertakings.”  “Novus Ordo Seclorum” means “New Order of the Ages.”  The use of the mottos and symbol reflect the Founding Fathers’ confidence in the new United States. “MDCCLXXVI” are Roman Numerals for “1776.”

Revised Dec. 23, 2016

Branching Howland (how Ralph met Val)

•June 19, 2017 • Comments Off on Branching Howland (how Ralph met Val)

This column was one of my Thanksgiving projects that had an unforeseen result.

My parents share common 17th century ancestors: Henry and Margaret Howland of Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England, parents of Plymouth Colony immigrants John Howland, Henry Howland, and Arthur Howland.  Henry and Margaret Howland are buried in the churchyard of the Church of St. Peter and St. Paul, Fenstanton.

My father is a descendant of Mayflower passenger John Howland. My mother can trace her ancestry to John Howland’s brother Arthur Howland, who came to Plymouth Colony at a later date, first mentioned as a planter of Duxbury in 1640. He was a Quaker at a time when Quakers were subjected to much persecution.  Arthur Howland was buried at Marshfield on 30 Oct 1675.  His wife, Margaret Reid, a widow (maiden name unknown), was also buried at Marshfield, on 22 Jan 1683.  Arthur Howland is an ancestor of Winston Churchill.

My mother’s line from Arthur Howland is as follows, beginning with Henry and Margaret Howland:

(1) Henry & Margaret Howland (2) Arthur & Margaret Howland (3) Elizabeth Howland & John Low (4) Elizabeth Low & Walter Joyce (5) Bathsheba Joyce & Ebenezer Mahurin (6) Stephen Mahurin & Unknown (7) Samuel Mahurin & Unknown (8) Sarah Mahurin & Thomas Scott Sr. (9) Thomas Scott Jr. & America Stillwell (10) Rachel Jane Scott & Wilson Milton Vaughan (11) Eric Lyman Vaughan & Nora Ann McMillen (12) Hillary Lillian Vaughan & Jesse Otto Jeffery Scarff (13) Valerie Berniece Jeffery Scarff & Ralph Vernon Chipman.

Above:  Memorial plaque for Henry Howland, father of Mayflower passenger John Howland, in the Church of St. Peter and St. Paul, Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England.

Couple No. 13 are my parents.  Ebenezer Mahurin (d. 1755) was the son of Hugh Mahurin of Taunton, MA (d. 1718).  Hugh Mahurin’s only proven child is Ebenezer, but it’s known he had other children.  The Mahurins are presumed to be of Scots-Irish descent.

The most comprehensive study of the Mahurin family is “Hugh Mahurin Of Taunton, Massachusetts” by Francis H. Huron, in the January, April, and July issues of The New England Historical and Genealogical Register for 1982.  According to Walter E. Hazen, who summarized some points of the Huron article:

The earliest record of Hugh Mahurin that we have is in Taunton, Mass. March 1692/3. Possibly he initially came, or was brought, there to work in one of the forges or iron works.  This is conjecture, but his son Ebenezer was later called ‘collyer’ in New Jersey, a term applied to iron workers in that period. This also could explain why Hugh received a grant of land at Taunton half a century after the town was established (Taunton Proprietor’s Records, 4:296, Bristol County Registry of Deeds):

This 15th of March 1692/3 is voted and granted to Hugh Mehurin ten acres of land in the plain that lieth between Samuel Crossman’s and Hart’s meadow in a valley near Stage pond provided it be no way prejudicial to any highway or former grant.

On 26 July 1695 Charles Williams of Taunton “for and in consideration of five pounds in silver money to him in hand paid by Hugh Mahurin of Taunton” sold him two adjoining parcels of land, one of ten acres, the other of seven-and-one-half acres (Bristol County Deeds, 12:117). Hugh Mahurin’s land was in the northeasterly section of Taunton which in 1731 became the town of Raynham. He acquired additional small amounts, as evidenced in the follow extracts from a deed dated 19 March 1717/18 (ibid., 12:116), which also contains vital information concerning his family:

Know ye that I Hugh Mahurin of Taunton in the County of Bristol–for & in consideration of that Love and affection which I beare to my Eldest son Ebenezer Mahurin as also in Consideration of a bond given me by my said Son Ebenezer Mahurin for the payment of fifteen pounds to my other Children in manner as is Expressed in said bond–Have given granted–& confirm unto him said Ebenezer Mahurin Two parcels of land which lay adjoining together within the Limits and bounds of said Taunton on which my dwelling house stands which I bought of Charles Williams by deed dated the Twenty Sixth day of July one thousand Six Hundred and Ninety and five. The first parcel being Ten acres more or less–The second Parcel is seven acres and half more or less–Together with five acres of land granted by the Proprietors on January 8th 1695 to me said Hugh Mahurin to lay on the left hand of the way by my own land neare Titicut Pond & five acres on the Right hand of the way opposite to it Together with a Little Piece of land about one acre and half or two acres lying adjoining to my own land on the Easterly of the lay Rhoad granted on January 19th 1713/14–only my son Ebenezer may at Present Improve Two acres where his house now Stands and the whole after the decease of his Father, Excepting only that my present wife Mary if she survive me and while she Continues my Widow shall enjoyed my present dwelling house and half an acre of land where the house stands which runs towards my son Ebenezer’s Farm.
The deed was witnessed by Samuel Danforth and Ebenezer Campbel.

Hugh Mahurin died intestate. The inventory of his estate noted “A true Inventory of all and singular the goods & chattels and credits of Hugh Mahurin yeoman deceased seized at Taunton on the nineteenth day of May in the year 1718 & by John Leonard & Ebenezer Cambel & John King,” and itemized a list of household goods, farm tools, and livestock with a total value of LB45.17 (Bristol County Probates, 3:439). The account of Ebenezer Mahurin, administrator of the estate of his father Hugh Mahurin, dated 4 February 1722/3, listed additional receipts and the payment of a lengthy list of debts and disbursements (ibid., 4:110).

The above records prove Hugh Mahurin had more than one son, and at least three children.

The maiden name of Hugh Mahurin’s wife Mary is unknown, but may have been Campbell. She married second William Bassett 19 Feb 1719 in Bridgewater.

John Low, father of Elizabeth (Low) Joyce, has been alleged to be a son of Thomas Low by his second wife Susannah; the claim being Thomas Low had sons named John by both wives.  I queried Bingham J.F. Lowe, the expert on this family, and was informed that our John Low wasn’t a son of Thomas Low, as Thomas Low didn’t mention him in his bible. Therefore, John Low’s ancestry is unknown.  John Low died 26 Mar 1676 during an Indian ambush in King Philip’s War.

[p. 349 lists John Low of Marshfield as a member of Capt. Michael Peirse’s company.  On Sunday, 26 Mar 1676 Peirse was lured into an ambush on the bank of a river near Seekonk (evidently the Seekonk River) and surrounded by a large force of Indians.  Available as free download from Google Books.  Click on image to enlarge.]

It’s not always possible to identify wives of pioneers, but I did locate the marriage bond of Thomas Scott Sr. (son of Arthur Scott) and Sarah Mahurin (daughter of Samuel Mahurin) in Shelby County, KY:

Dr. George E. McCracken, FASG, wrote a brief article about Arthur Howland, including a transcription of his will and inventory.  Rather than re-invent the wheel, here it is:

Anthony Snow, an ancestor of my father’s, took the inventory.  Arthur Howland left my mother’s ancestress, Elizabeth Low, 10 pounds to be paid after the death of his wife.  Though McCracken gives the wife of Henry Howland of Fenstanton as “Ann,” Susan E. Roser and others call her “Margaret.”   You’ll note that McCracken complains about Franklyn Howland’s slipshod transcription.  I can sympathize—transcribing a document that old is hard work.

Revised Sep. 19, 2016